Elephant twins in the Milgis??

To wake up in the morning to this beautiful scene of  an Elephant with her supposedly twins is magnificent.. Is the Milgis doing at least some things right!!

To wake up in the morning to this beautiful scene of an Elephant with her possible twins is magnificent.. Is the Milgis doing at least some things right!!

 

Could this be possible? I’ve never heard of Elephant twins before, but the other morning I woke up to a nice scene down on the Milgis Lugga.. two herds of Elephants in the middle of the lugga, enjoying the nice fresh shoots,  where the water flowed after the last ‘out of season rain’ that we were lucky to have about 4 weeks ago!.. First we were excited because they were completely relaxed, which is a credit to our work.. Then I noticed about a km away from the herd one Elephant still drinking from the well, and checking it out with the binoculars, was surprised to see two young ones with her.. Really very small.. She was not perturbed at all at being left behind, and after she had had her fill she sauntered across to where the herd was with the two in tow, and after about an hour had mingled in with the others..

Exciting stuff.. This Elephant mum was completely relaxed, right in the open, with these two small ones following..

Exciting stuff.. This Elephant mum was completely relaxed, right in the open, with these two small ones following..

 

finally the three of them joined the rest of the herd, and all the little ones immediately started playing and chasing each other around.. No sign of stress in the herd..

finally the three of them joined the rest of the herd, and all the little ones immediately started playing and chasing each other around.. No sign of stress in the herd..

 

Any way we have a couple of scouts trying to follow the herd, to watch and see if they actually can see both feeding at the same time.. then we will know!!

 

 

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Elephant twins in the Milgis??

  1. What a great sight Helen! and what an amazing job your scouts and the Milgis Trust is doing – fantastic work! I think ele twins are unusual, but unless the mum has adopted a calf of the same age, it looks like that is what it is. The timing is good – a good green season will boost her milk – let’s hope they both make it.

  2. Wow, I hope that’s a good omen. I cut this below from an article about twins born in the Kruger, thought it was interesting:

    Such a proliferation of elephant calves is uncommon, particularly given that the gestation period for a female elephant is a staggering 22 months. At birth, a calf can weigh as much as 120 kg (265 lb) and needs a substantial amount of milk to survive, which, in the case of twins, places substantial pressure on the mother.However, according to mammal guide book author Richard Despard Estes, female elephants which are closely related to the mother often cross-suckle each other’s calves to reduce the pressure. Some cows continue to lactate indefinitely which increases access to the milk source for the young calves. Hendrik suggests that this may have contributed to the successful survival of these two sets of twin calves.Additionally, breeding herds are very protective of elephant calves and as long as the herd can stay together larger predators are usually deterred and prey on other species.Hendrik admits to never having witnessed such an incredible sight in all the twenty years he has been in the bush. He adds as an afterthought: ‘It reminded me that no matter how long you have lived in the bush, there will always be something more to surprise you!’

  3. Hi helen – my dad and mum documented elephant twins in Manyara back in the 70’s. Oria wrote a book about it. It’s very rare but happens on occasion. Rarely do both survive, sadly. So am wondering how badly you’ve been affected by the failing rains this last season. Down near the Ewaso it’s very dry. Very little edible vegetation left. Another possibility is that the baby could be an orphan from her larger family.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s